1968 Bonneville: Borg Instruments Clock Repair

MrLonely

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I am in the process of fixing everything in my dash for my '68 Bonnie and I am unsure of how to go about fixing the original analog clock. I energized the clock and it started ticking for a bit but then stopped. I couldn't get it to tick anymore after that. Also my set knob seems to not work. I'd appreciate any help on taking apart the clock. It is most likely seized up and just needs to be cleaned and greased. Any help much appreciated!
 

MrLonely

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I did, turns out I have a clock that is slightly different that the main one that came with the car. I finally got it apart and I have noticed a few of the plastic gears are broken. So I'd like to find somewhere for replacement gears.
 

melsg5

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Try the restoration services, for example Smiths Classic Car Clocks.
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MrLonely

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Well no luck finding any replacement gears. I may come across something some day but I may try to 3D print some gears myself. It's a shame as it is only the adjustment gears that are bad. My mechanical mechanism works flawlessly. Haha
 

melsg5

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Maybe find a non-working clock as a parts donor?
I guess you dont want to replace with quartz movement?
 

cammerjeff

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Belleville MI
I agree, if you don't replace the movement with a modern Quartz Movement, be prepared to take the clock apart often, and reset the time weekly if not daily.
Those clocks were not very accurate when new, nor were they very durable. Most auto clocks up until the late 1980's would commonly stop working in as little as a year or 2.
If you don't want to replace the movement, obtaining a spare for parts is your best bet.

Good luck with it.
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MrLonely

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MrLonely

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I agree, if you don't replace the movement with a modern Quartz Movement, be prepared to take the clock apart often, and reset the time weekly if not daily.
Those clocks were not very accurate when new, nor were they very durable. Most auto clocks up until the late 1980's would commonly stop working in as little as a year or 2.
If you don't want to replace the movement, obtaining a spare for parts is your best bet.

Good luck with it.
Yeah I am quite aware of maintenance these clocks need. XD I will convert to quartz eventually, just thought I'd enjoy the little piece of history while I still could. However, I was timing my clock and its actually pretty accurate to the second. Just thought that was cool.
 
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